Suby & Sins House

27 Oct 2006 1,235 views
 
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photoblog image 99 in the Shade #5

99 in the Shade #5

Sinem In The House

See  policyofsubster

Hijab, niqab, jilbab - having witnessed the debates all over our 'sceptred isle', sparked by Jack Straw's well-meant words at an ill-advised time (mind you, I think it was about time the debates started) over the last few weeks, we have all got enlightened in the use of  multifareous terms defining multifareous inventive forms of covering one's body.

One side of the argument claim that women should be given the right and freedom to cover up as they wish within their religious and traditional beliefs and stopping them from doing so is just as bad as labelling young women who are dressed in little more than nothing as 'sluts'; the other side of the argument suggest the use of the veil in any of its various forms is an obstacle in the process of integrating in a multicultural society as it creates a barrier in social life, defying the very essence of multiculturalism which can only be established through integration without barriers.

The debate has now moved onto faith-schools and whether they can feasibly carry on admitting students of one faith. The controversies which emerged as a result of one woman's refusal to take off her hijab and decision to take her case to the employment tribunal against her employer *- ironically, a Christian faith school, seem set to continue for a while longer.

As a result, today's post is the two ladies, foreign and alien on a beach full of people in their bikinis, speedos and thongs, yet very much a part of Turkey's paradoxical street scenes - topless girls and veiled ladies, late night clubs with alcohol and coffeehouses in the Islamic parts of town where alcohol is strictly prohibited.  One clear-cut difference in Turkey is the French style secularism embraced since the very day it was established as one of the various reforms by Ataturk in a bid to 'Westernise' the new republic of Turkey.** Hence, although eighty odd years later, some women have resorted back to the old ways of the Islamic Ottoman Empire by donning the veils, they are still few and far between in many parts of the country, hence look alien, like the two ladies on the beach, amidst the crowd, looking more conspicuous, ironically, despite their attempt to look inconspicuous.

*http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/5412182.stm

**http://www.allaboutturkey.com/ita/reform.htm

For more information of Alanya, visit: http://www.about-turkey.com/tourism/alanya.htm

Words and photography by Sinem

P.s. Sinem & I are off in London today, she off to the library to do some work on her Phd (poor girl) and me, to a Photoshop seminar with Bert Monroy (lucky me) The things I do for my art LOL

"Ars longa, vita brevis"

99 in the Shade #5

Sinem In The House

See  policyofsubster

Hijab, niqab, jilbab - having witnessed the debates all over our 'sceptred isle', sparked by Jack Straw's well-meant words at an ill-advised time (mind you, I think it was about time the debates started) over the last few weeks, we have all got enlightened in the use of  multifareous terms defining multifareous inventive forms of covering one's body.

One side of the argument claim that women should be given the right and freedom to cover up as they wish within their religious and traditional beliefs and stopping them from doing so is just as bad as labelling young women who are dressed in little more than nothing as 'sluts'; the other side of the argument suggest the use of the veil in any of its various forms is an obstacle in the process of integrating in a multicultural society as it creates a barrier in social life, defying the very essence of multiculturalism which can only be established through integration without barriers.

The debate has now moved onto faith-schools and whether they can feasibly carry on admitting students of one faith. The controversies which emerged as a result of one woman's refusal to take off her hijab and decision to take her case to the employment tribunal against her employer *- ironically, a Christian faith school, seem set to continue for a while longer.

As a result, today's post is the two ladies, foreign and alien on a beach full of people in their bikinis, speedos and thongs, yet very much a part of Turkey's paradoxical street scenes - topless girls and veiled ladies, late night clubs with alcohol and coffeehouses in the Islamic parts of town where alcohol is strictly prohibited.  One clear-cut difference in Turkey is the French style secularism embraced since the very day it was established as one of the various reforms by Ataturk in a bid to 'Westernise' the new republic of Turkey.** Hence, although eighty odd years later, some women have resorted back to the old ways of the Islamic Ottoman Empire by donning the veils, they are still few and far between in many parts of the country, hence look alien, like the two ladies on the beach, amidst the crowd, looking more conspicuous, ironically, despite their attempt to look inconspicuous.

*http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/5412182.stm

**http://www.allaboutturkey.com/ita/reform.htm

For more information of Alanya, visit: http://www.about-turkey.com/tourism/alanya.htm

Words and photography by Sinem

P.s. Sinem & I are off in London today, she off to the library to do some work on her Phd (poor girl) and me, to a Photoshop seminar with Bert Monroy (lucky me) The things I do for my art LOL

"Ars longa, vita brevis"

comments (21)

  • nev
  • Australia
  • 27 Oct 2006, 00:27
Sinem i like the procession on the beach The blur around the woman is a little distracting but nice shot.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Nev; the procession on the beach is fun to watch - perfect site for a people-watcher like me!
smile
Sinem
  • Mal
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Oct 2006, 00:31
Hey Sinem, my cold is getting better but this image really appeals to me at the moment! i also really like this interaction that you've captured with the young boy and I presume parent? Lovely image. Mal
Suby & Sinem: I guess she is the parent... Thank you, Mal. Sinem
  • E Etomi
  • Nigeria
  • 27 Oct 2006, 02:39
Nice depiction of the topic. Did you do some cloning work?
Suby & Sinem: Yeah, the cat's out of the bag - indeed I have cloned a huge child out of the shot. whoops! Sinem
  • Mia
  • United States
  • 27 Oct 2006, 04:03
I wasn't a big fan of the shot (the blur on the lady's back on the left kinda had me go "hmmmmm..."), but your words put a whole new meanign to it. We've had these discussions at dinner tables and me being me, believe in everyone being the way they are, as difference brings out the beauty in life. But then, from a realistic point of view, few people make very good claims as to why people should not dress differently. Good, but not good enough I always say ehehe.
Suby & Sinem: Hmmmm... I know what it is you were wondering about.
Thanks for responding to the issue of the day as well, especially on a Friday when most folk are looking forward to the weekend and do not want to dwell much on more serious side of life. Thanks. Sinem
I havn't really got into the beach shots u have been posting Sinem...Please don't get mad - the framing is off here, thrs empty space on the left..it would have been good if you had turned to the right a lil to capture more of the beach procession, having the subjects sitting on the sand at the bottom left of the shot...Making this a horizontal shot would have made this even better..Doing this would have prevented the top of the building being shown-really thrs no point it being there, half of the top is cut off anyway..also, im sure there was a good reason for you to clone what seems like a person (?) out of the pic, but it is a bit distracting...

Having said all this, i do realize that you also posted this to show, among other things, the varied culture in places like Turkey..Here in SL it is much the same..

Yanik grin
Suby & Sinem: Oh Yanik; I am soooo mad, don't even go there, mate! Just kidding... Each one to their own. I tried different crops, but theuy just didn't work for me - if I crop out the empty space, the photo loses all its balance. I could have tried to take the shot from a different angle - but I could only take one shot, trying to be discrete. Even then I used Suby's niece who was with me at the time to make it look like I was taking her picture. Unfortunately, I am not yet as brave as just to keep my head high and shoot people with them knowing - at least some people anyway. Oh well, not all of us can have Suby's guts, I guess.
Thanks.
  • bruno
  • Sweden
  • 27 Oct 2006, 08:19
yeah, its good to see all men bathing and feel the sun on their skin, but all ladies looks like those two, that makes me angry. iv raised up like muslim i cant undestand why all ladies are standing out with that, of course its a "religious" and cultural thing but...come on.... 2000 century! im not muslim today,im christian and im glad for that, cause my wife dont have to ware chlothes like that. Tnx very much for this shot, its emotional,and it makes my mind to start think about the situation they live in.thank u so much for that. smile
Suby & Sinem: Bruno, I don't think it's so much of a Muslim/Christian issue - but personal choice. I come from a country where 99% of people are Muslim; and I don't know many women who cover up, at least not in my family or circle of friends or in the part of town I used to live in and stil visit. I have only worn a veil to go into a mosque, so in a secular country, it is more of a personal choice. I do wonder at times about their lives as well...
Thanks for the comments. Sinem
  • PhotoSam
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Oct 2006, 08:59
I think secularism rocks. I also think it's great that these women choose to don burkhas. In the end it's up to the people, it's wrong of us to start telling people what not to wear. I'm a social recluse and yet because I wear t-shirt and jeans no one's ever going to tell me anything (I am Indian, so that satisfies the multicultural bit too). I love this shot, its really deep. I fpeople want to follow religion, let them. People have a right to have strong beliefs (personaly, I'm rather indifferent to religion) and if these women have the guts to wear a burkha on the beach I say Let Them....
Suby & Sinem: Personally I am ver much indifferent to religion as well but I'd rather our religious clothes didn't get in the way of our daily lives. I'd rather feel the water on my skin than feel like I've been soaked under a torrential downpour, but then it's just my opinion. Thanks for your comments. Sinem
  • micki
  • United States
  • 27 Oct 2006, 11:27
Interesting read today, Sinem!

You all have a great day in London. PhD...you go, Sin!!
Suby & Sinem: Hey, Micki. I've been missing your visits; glad to see you back and glad you liked the read. PhD... Go girl? I am trying, do believe me smile Sinem
  • Chantal
  • Netherlands
  • 27 Oct 2006, 13:11
I feel the warmth....
  • atunbi
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Oct 2006, 13:52
hmmmm, suby dig out ya archives man. or go out and shoot i go vex for you ooooo
  • Intern
  • United States
  • 27 Oct 2006, 15:48
Hijab, niqab, jilbab .... Two other words come to my mind - abaya and burqa ... But I dont know the subtle differences ... Now I am curious to find out.

Suby, This shot is a documentary type of shot. It should come out in a journal. Very well done ... the commentary is very informative.
Suby & Sinem: I think they are differentiated according to how much they cover up ranging from hijab to burqa; we have just been enlightened over on this side of the Atlantic, thanks to the recent debates in the media. Thank you for visiting; this Sinem actually, glad the commentary was useful and you also liked the shot. Sinem
hi Suby,
I like this 'reportage' style.
Suby & Sinem: Hi Sguardiamo, this is Sinem actually. Thank you for your comment. Sinem
Hi Suby, this shot conveys your message perfectly. Congrats, Neil.
Suby & Sinem: Hi, Neil, this is Sinem actually; glad you liked the shot. Sinem
  • Laurie
  • United States
  • 27 Oct 2006, 21:23
I think the blur on the left is a bit too much but otherwise I like the tones and the overall feeling of the shot. I think having them with their backs to the camera is also very effective and goes well with the theme of the shot and your words.

I have seen that on the beaches here in NJ a couple of times, it's pretty rare here as you can imagine, but it's nice to know that people can be free to do what their exercise their beliefs as their conscience allows.
  • Laurie
  • United States
  • 27 Oct 2006, 21:26
I meant to say "free to exercise their beliefs as their conscience allows". Distractions, distractions! The cat of all things is yelling at me so I paid attention to her and derailed my train of thought while typing the above comment.

Sorry
Suby & Sinem: I can so totally empathise - cats are such self-obsessed creatures, aren't they? Jazz is staring at me as I type, asking with big 'puppy eyes' when I am going to shower him with attention. I am try....innnggg....not...tmkbc#m to yied'v;k
yield to.....DISTRAC....
  • Alicia
  • United States
  • 28 Oct 2006, 16:43
There's something different about this. I love the blur.
Love the soft processing and unusual composition!
Thank's for your nice pictures. Merci beaucoup. A bientôt. Hope see you soon.
NIce work Suby....great commentary and great photo. Phil
hye suby & sinemsmile this is a very nice issue to be discuss..to me, when people started to comment on things that they do not 100percent understand,it's just not right.Im a muslim and im sad when people wrongly intrepret my religion..i say, open your mind..go out of the shell.Make sure about what you wanted to say is right, study about them,or else you'll hurt other people feelings.It doesnt mean when you wear hijab or veil,your an alien.Same as when you wear a bikini in very strict muslim country.Im not being one sided here, but, as far as i concern, i never heard of any complain from a muslim country, complaining about a tourist wearing bikinis on their beach. Come on, where is the respect ?Thank god i live in Malaysia, where everyone respects everyone..especially their faith and religion.And such issues never occurs.And yeah, it's a personal choice, so dont be angry with the two woman, they are practising their religion..so, we have to respect them.Give More respect to everyone, and the world would be a better place..
Suby & Sinem: Thanks for the words Abdul, I have only just come across this comment, I think funny enough you may like my post & comments for todays picture on my blog

Suby
about the picture, the meanings & the moment that you captured rise above evrything...great photosmile

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