Suby & Sins House

03 Nov 2006 2,602 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Poverty  - Cleaned Up

Poverty - Cleaned Up

Suby In The House

See  policyofsubster

Funny a theme on poverty is running on the day I choose to post up this shot. I have been planning for some time to do a series on the homeless, finding the images though is easier said than done.

Not too many homeless in Milton Keynes. I generally have to be in a city like London before I can get any images, and thats if they want to be photographed.  This image is what I see when I look at the homeless, dirty, down on their luck, wanting to be faceless.

I see the homeless, I do not judge them, we all live with our individual demons. It is a constant reminder for me to thank the good Lord for what I have, a roof over my head, clean clothes, a loving family, a loving wife, a car, shoes, a comb, the little & big luxuries I may take for granted. It tugs my heart when I see people like this, I wish there was more I could do, I wish there was more that was done to help people like these, but I also remind myself that some of them are out in the streets by choice, and some have the choice made for them.

Spare a thought for that nameless homeless person you walk past everyday, thank the big guy for the love, grace and mercies he has bestowed on you.

I really am sorry I have not been blogging as much as I used to.  I have taken the plunge to becoming a Pro Photographer and life is so hectic and busy these days, trying to set up things. I do try and respond to comments and visit blogs when I can, so please keep visiting & commenting, I will keep posting. Do all have a lovely weekend.

P.s

Anyone looking for the services of Suby as a Photographer, you know what to do..... (email me in case some are wondering what. LOL)

Words and photography by Suby

"Ars longa, vita brevis"

Poverty - Cleaned Up

Suby In The House

See  policyofsubster

Funny a theme on poverty is running on the day I choose to post up this shot. I have been planning for some time to do a series on the homeless, finding the images though is easier said than done.

Not too many homeless in Milton Keynes. I generally have to be in a city like London before I can get any images, and thats if they want to be photographed.  This image is what I see when I look at the homeless, dirty, down on their luck, wanting to be faceless.

I see the homeless, I do not judge them, we all live with our individual demons. It is a constant reminder for me to thank the good Lord for what I have, a roof over my head, clean clothes, a loving family, a loving wife, a car, shoes, a comb, the little & big luxuries I may take for granted. It tugs my heart when I see people like this, I wish there was more I could do, I wish there was more that was done to help people like these, but I also remind myself that some of them are out in the streets by choice, and some have the choice made for them.

Spare a thought for that nameless homeless person you walk past everyday, thank the big guy for the love, grace and mercies he has bestowed on you.

I really am sorry I have not been blogging as much as I used to.  I have taken the plunge to becoming a Pro Photographer and life is so hectic and busy these days, trying to set up things. I do try and respond to comments and visit blogs when I can, so please keep visiting & commenting, I will keep posting. Do all have a lovely weekend.

P.s

Anyone looking for the services of Suby as a Photographer, you know what to do..... (email me in case some are wondering what. LOL)

Words and photography by Suby

"Ars longa, vita brevis"

comments (56)

  • johnnyg
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 3 Nov 2006, 00:11
I echo your sentiments big guy, I like you live in an area where we don't get to see many images like this and your words mirror my thoughts, nice capture none the less. Wish I had something to post for this theme!
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Johhny,

SUby
A very dramatic sight - Bravo Suby !
And good luck for your professionnal challenge, I saw lot of shot from you and I've no doubt about your full success !
Suby & Sinem: FIngers crossed it will all go fine smile

Suby
  • nev
  • Australia
  • 3 Nov 2006, 00:57
very nicely processed shot suby. does remind me of g8. i read your words and share your sentiments but the thing that sits uncomfortably for me is the fact that he does not want to be photographed.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Nev.

Suby
hey suby,

a perfect capture to convey the sentiments of many members of the homeless population. it is a crime that so many people, throughout the world, want so desperately to remain invisible and faceless. congrats on the pro photographer move! best of luck.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Nicole, looking forward to making a success of myself grin

Suby
  • Lara
  • Philippines
  • 3 Nov 2006, 01:25
This picture has drama on it. even though the man refused for you to take his pic you still managed to take a great shot at him. smile
I bumped into your photoblog from a friend's blog. You're a pro.
This picture has drama on it. even though the man refused for you to take his pic you still managed to take a great shot at him. smile
Suby & Sinem: Thanks, me a pro, I wish smile More like a wnanbe pro grin Thanks for visiting, do visit again.

Suby
I bumped into your photoblog from a friend's blog. You're a pro.
This picture has drama on it. even though the man refused for you to take his pic you still managed to take a great shot of him. smile
Nice capture but the skin colour is off.
  • Temi
  • 3 Nov 2006, 02:46
Technically good shot. Especially like his feet. It really bothers me that he doesn't want his photo taken. It's not like he could go into his house and shut the door.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Temi, hazards of street photography, one has to be careful though, do not want anyone punching my lights out grin

Suby
  • aaron
  • United States
  • 3 Nov 2006, 03:14
this image seems to have a strange "gaussian glow" to it? in a good way
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Bro, did not add any G glow at all smile

Suby
  • Laurie
  • United States
  • 3 Nov 2006, 03:29
*Sigh* One of the saddest things for me here in the States is the reality that so many of these people could be helped relatively easily. And what I mean by that is that many far too many are needlessly on the street because of untreated mental illness. I know this from personal experience how impossible it is to compell, force people into treatment. Treatment that would likely make them functional and able to contribute and participate in society again, to live again.

Compelling shot.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Laurie, I know what you are talking about, like the choice has already been made for them, It is a sad world that has anyone homeless ot living in poverty. Aim of this shot is to drive that point home in my own way.

Suby
  • Mia
  • United States
  • 3 Nov 2006, 04:26
The lighting makes the shot powerful. I think this is one of those rare shots I actually love seeing horizontal.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Mai, more landscape crops for you, You will like tomorrows shot in that case smile

Suby
impressive shot.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Bro, glad you like.

Suby
quite a dramatic portrait with very good colour tones
Suby & Sinem: Thanks David, glad you like.

Suby
Yes indeed Suby. I see this on an almost daily basis in Johannesburg and feel the same way as you do. What is really ironic, is that the money we spend on the camera equipment we use to take photographs of these poor individuals, could probably feed one of them for a substantial amount of time. I think this is a great shot, glad he didn't get up and give you a slap afterwards. Guess my chance of winning the theme challenge just went out of the window!! Regards, Neil.
Suby & Sinem: LOL, Neil, street photography is not for those not brave, one takes a chance everyday one is out photographing, all it takes is you taking the wrong picture of the wrong person at the wrong time. I try to be as friendly in my deamenor as I can when taking pictures, always have a smile on my face, when busted, smile back, nod head, point to camera asking for okay to continue shooting (with a smile on face ofcourse) and I generally always get the go-ahead.

DO NOT take images of kids unless permission from parents obtained.

With this in mind, I also pray hard no one beats me up for shooting on the street smile

Suby
  • Shanti
  • Switzerland
  • 3 Nov 2006, 09:15
What bothers me here is that this person obviously did not want to be photographed. He is a person, not just some "homeless subject" for your poverty theme. The fact that you took the picture despite his wishes, added to the fact that you posted it on the internet (futher disrespecting his privacy) does not say much for how you've "spared a thought" for him. "Spare a thought for that nameless homeless person you walk past everyday, thank the big guy for the love, grace and mercies he has bestowed on you"?? Thanking God that you're not in the same place as that man is NOT sparing a thought or even a bit of heart for him. It is simply arrogance.
Suby & Sinem: Fair comment Shanti, when taking street photographs, I generally stand and shoot, I was stood in front of this chap, and was taking pictures, this was the only snap of him I took, he did not want me to take any other images, I did tell him I had taken the shot, and dropped a few quid his way, more images would have cost me more, but as he did not initially want to be taken I moved on.

Now I took this shot to stress my point, one thing one has to realise, in a public place, any image is fair game. I respect the privacy of people as much as I can but then if we went up to everyone that had their picture taken in public asking "is it okay to take and post your picture on a web site? Life sure ain't going to be fun anymore.

Suby
Very powerful shot but I wish you had respect his/her desire to not being photographed
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Navin, I did, was taking the shot, raised his arm, but too late shot taken, hazards of the trade my friend. smile We all take sneaky images of people, I just take mine a sterp further by doing mine in the open.

Suby
  • Shanti
  • Switzerland
  • 3 Nov 2006, 11:22
Well, if it's all about how fun life is, then it's another matter, isn't it? Given this man's reaction when you "took" the picture, would you really have to even ask him if you could post it on the internet? Common sense and compassion seem to be the areas of poverty depicted here.
Suby & Sinem: Fair comment again Shanti, not dissagreeing with anything said. Now for me. My aim is/was not to depict anyone other than how I percieve the scene. Have a another shot from a different scene coming up tomorrow, let me know what your veiws are on that one smile

SUby
  • Ellie
  • United Kingdom
  • 3 Nov 2006, 11:24
It's a powerful image and it says what you want it to.

I think there's a trade-off between protecting people and capturing the shot you're (we're) looking for. I'm uneasy that this picture seems to show that this man, who is vulnerable, does not want to be photographed.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Elle, I do understand where you are coming from & do agree. It is a trade off though, I guess side of capturing the image and sharing it with folks got the best of me smile

Suby
  • chunter
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 3 Nov 2006, 11:31
This is indeed a powerful, if slightly over-processed image. In the poverty stakes, it's one of any number of similr images - quite ordinary. But the power in this shot, for me, comes from the intent of the subject and the interaction between him and the photographer.

This is why I don't do many "people" shots. I wonder how I would feel if someone caught me in public and started taking photographs specifically of me; my wife; my mother and father. OK fine if I happen to be an incidental character in a wider scene; not so if it's personal without asking first.

On this occasion, Suby, I think that knowing he didn't want his photo taken, it is not enough to say you'd already got one in the bag before he reacted to your intention. If I had even been in that position, I would have felt obliged to delete it, or at the very least keep it private. It's a cop out to try to justify it by calling it "street photography". You can see from this that the guy is trying to protect himself from what to him must have felt like a physical assault - as though something was going to shoot out of your lens and strike him.

Hmm, I don't usually get this passionate. You must have struck a chord. Sorry friend.
Suby & Sinem: Colin, I like that the image has got you all passionate albeit for maybe the wrong reasons grin I do agree that the power of this shot is in his reaction. and the interaction. However I was aware not many people would appreciate this image, however, it still is one of my favourite images that packs a punch. Not defending myself, just explaining myself smile

Suby
  • Chantal
  • Netherlands
  • 3 Nov 2006, 11:46
impressive photo.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Chantal, I am really enjoying the passion this shot has invoked in people, some for the right reasons and some for the wrong, the power of an image :p

Suby
  • Petra
  • Netherlands
  • 3 Nov 2006, 11:56
I think this photo should not be displayed on the internet....
Its all about respect....
Petra
Suby & Sinem: Fair comment Petra, one always has to respect other peoples veiw, I posted this shot for a reason and it can be seen by the reactions I am getting to this comment, I did think hard and long before posting it. However in the context of the way it has been used/potrayed, it works in my humble opinion. Read the comments below from Laurie from South Africa, she makes some very valid points smile

Suby
  • Abi
  • United Kingdom
  • 3 Nov 2006, 12:10
I agree with Petra ...NO should be NO...it's all about preserving Human dignity..sorry subs
Suby & Sinem: Abi, I think you sorta answered yourself in your second comment. I do agree with your comment. It is about preserving human dignity, at least I hope I am one of those photographers who retains some form of respect for his fellow man. Read Laurie from Soth Africa's & christophe comments below. They also make some valid points (I am not taking sides on this debate) grin

Suby
  • Abi
  • United Kingdom
  • 3 Nov 2006, 12:17
http://yeni.shutterchance.com/photoblog/14699.htm ...this is another scenario where the individual doesn't want a photograph taken... are the interactions any different
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 3 Nov 2006, 12:29
Poverty - cleaned up. What a title Suby - this guy is all but cleaned up.

Oh and again the comments about you abusing the vulnerable guy begging for money. Why is his hand up - to try and stop you from taking the photo before you paid him? Or does he not want his picture taken at all. Who knows.

What I know is that if you don't have qualms to sit like this in public, expecting the public to contribute (wonder what's on his sign) - then you should have issues with public things happening to you.

You watch all the shots on theme9 - what about the blind guy? Did he agree to be photographed? I bet not - yet all thinks it is a good photo. I bet my bottom dollar if you took a photo with a zoom from some distance and your guy's hands were not up (remember we now know he doesn't agree) and you produced a shot of your normal quality, everyone would have oohed and ah. I am very sure you are not the first to take a photo of this person.

It could be that it is exactly this ambivalent thinking from behind pc screens that keeps real poverty from being addressed. Believe me, there is real poverty and chosen poverty and I would be the first to say I would not know which applies in a specific case without thorough study. I do know that there is nothing you can do about chosen poverty.

I do not judge this guy or any person - I have it against the line of thinking of some other comments here.

You are a photographer, recently gone pro. People in photo journalism will tell you that you capture it as it is. Photo of a dying child in Beirut or another american shot to pieces in Iraq - are you going to ask their permission or drop a few bob before you take the photo. That does not happen. In the same way you do not ask these people permission to publish.

In this world we are living in I believe with you that if you are taking a photo of a child and the parents are available that you can ask their permission - it is a good tactic.

I am sorry for going on, but I believe it needs to be said.
Suby & Sinem: Louis, I have to 1st of all thank you for taking the time to post your veiws, I like it when images are able to provoke some sorta debate and reactions from the veiwers.

The title "Poverty - All Cleaned Up" lets just say it says and shows this in all it's glory, I hope not in a degrading manner.

I put some money into his cup, stepped back, hand still up and he left it there when I took the shot, he said he did not want me to take any more images unless I paid, was not interested in taking any more images (the guys where leaving me behind) so I dropped some more money in his cup & moved on.

I do agree with you on the points you make, I could easily have stepped quite a distance back, whipped out my zoom lens and taken this shot and people would not be the wiser and go, amazing shot, however I am more of an "in your face" kinda street photographer, there is more of an impact from these sort of capture, a little risky, but what the hell, someone has to do it smile

I went to an exhibition on this day with Jide, Abi & Jamey, there were some photo journalistic images in some books the guys where looking at I would not even look at. A little to real for me, anyone who thinks this is taken it too far has not really been out there. I have seen an image taken by a world renowned journalist of a guy just about toi get his brain blown off, what would the guiys have said if that was posted here, respect, decency? That image won many awards round the world for the photographer and highlighted the plights of the people in that war.

There is a line each photographer needs to say "I WILL NOT CROSS THAT LINE" mine has not been crossed with this image, it isn't deamening, it is there to he lp highlight the fate of the unseen faceless homeless.

Now it's my turn to apologise for going on smile Thanks again for your comments, very greatly appreciated.

Suby
mmmh, a difficult one for me... let me start with the good stuff - the processing packs a punch so very well done here! grin.

I am still not cormfortable with street photography and the risks of some guy knocking one's lights out. however, as it stands, once out in public, there is no law (that I know of) that stops anyone taking a photograph. There is all the CCTV everywhere you go nowadays, so like or not you are captured on someone's film. In fact you going into some offices and u get a protrait (there's one of me from LUL I particularly liked I refused to return the visitors pass that was the excuse fior the portrait.

In the end I go with the comments of Louise from South Africa. The picture tells a story through the photographer's lens. Those that showed the pic of a dying princess Diana did not seek permission, nor Sven and his grilfriends etc etc....With that I am goig out on dat streets to take some pics. Wish me luck
Suby & Sinem: Thanks bro, you are correct, I like that this image has generated such a debate, now for me that is the power of an image at work tongue You know how careful one has to be when street shooting, remember getting stopped by the cops a few weeks ago. No for the lily hearted but if done right, amazing images are yours, have a look at Jides Steet phone blog, he has some lovely images there.

Suby
  • rabby
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 3 Nov 2006, 15:37
ugly shot, fair game with the shot taken but posting him on the internet is what is controversial, seems like he is trying to retain some self respect on the other hand the photographer is trying to lose some...

p.s. if this was your brother (it can happen to everyone) - would you have plastered him on the web?

C'mon BRO, you know this is not good...
Suby & Sinem: If it was my brother and the image worked in the context of what I was trying to depict, yes his image goes up (& I AM SERIOUS). I however do understand where you are coming from and your sentiments, I am not in the realms of the paparazzi, I just take what I see smile Thanks for taking the time to comment on this image, your veiws are appreciated and respected :d

Suby
  • faustina
  • United States
  • 3 Nov 2006, 15:47
I kind of have to agree with the previous comment by rabby. I know that it is provactive, and that's what you probably wanted, but it seems disrespectful to me. The most meaningful photos of homeless to me are from http://www.snowsuit.net/ - those are always people willing.
  • chris p
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 3 Nov 2006, 17:16
First off good luck with the business move, it's not easy making a buck from photography. But if you continue to produce images that stir the emotions like this does Suby you stand a good chance of making it. Well captured sir.
  • Mal
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 3 Nov 2006, 17:56
What a response, this page ain't going to be long enough for this image Subster. I'm going to devolve myself from commenting on the ethical issue and comment on pure photographic terms and tell you that the image is powerful. Mal
Nice shot my friend. Beat mine all to peices. Good luck on the plunge. I hope to be able to make some $$$ at this some day. I find myself doing a lot of charity jobs, which is good experience, and a couple of events and weddings here and there. I'd like to do more and have time to hone my PS skills. But my regular job keeps me busy during the day, and I'm beat at night.

Anyway.....good luck, I'll send you all my European business.

Have a good weekend.....

m~
  • PhotoSam
  • United Kingdom
  • 3 Nov 2006, 18:13
like it...lighting is just a wee bit off though...love what youre trying to portray...
Excellent expression of the poverty them. I imagine the story behind the picture is as interesting and heartbreaking as the photo itself.
Suby, these kind of photo should not be published. This man have the rigtht to be respected as all of us and it's obvious that he didn't want to be photografed.
  • Sinem
  • Milton Keynes, UK
  • 3 Nov 2006, 20:58
How blooming politically correct are we all gettng guys? One point which I think Suby failed to clarify was that the chap in the photo asked him for money to pose - I don't think, for one minute, this photo would have stirred so much strom in a tea cup if he was happily/miserably/sadly/a few pennies richer looking into the camera rather than putting his hand up to cover his face. The gesture is not a sign of 'the wish not to be photographed' but of 'the wish not to be photographed without getting paid for it'. Is it, by nature, any different, in instinct, than Posh and Becks taking extreme security measures not to get their wedding photographed but selling the photos to OK! or celebrities covering up their kids until the photos are centre-spread in Hallo.

Is what Suby's done any different, n nature, and by instinct, than war photography? As Louise said, when a war photographer captures the image of a dying child and emails it over to Reuters, is that child losing his/her dignity? Or does it help the world to see the lack of dignity that child is subjected to through the atrocities of war?

The ever so famous Vietnam photo which was recently on the list for the most memorable photographs in the Times... Could the cruelty of humanity be captured for humanity if the photographer had thought, 'Oh let me see, by taking the shot, I'd be taking away this guy's dignity. In fact, let me tae the film out and expose it so the photo is ruined even before it s developed.'

Let's stop turning a blind eye. The lens sees whom you tend to walk by, averting your eyes every single day; for once, do not 'shoot the messenger' but open your eyes. You will see that the hands held up in defiance are your own trying to cover up your eyes.

a very moved Sinem
  • Cassiopea
  • Boston
  • 3 Nov 2006, 21:25
Yes let's not shoot the messenger. I agree with Suby and Sinem, stop the hurt if it's to go on. Moving debate you guys have going on here. Have you read a book called The Sahir by Paulo Coelho? It gives you yet another twist on homelesness, he always adds the magic touch to life and that's why I love him. Love always. xx
Oh yeah....I am loving this.
  • Dia
  • Greece
  • 3 Nov 2006, 21:43
Great post Suby...I feel the same as well when I pass through the homeless in Athens. I give them clothes whenever I come, and with some of them, I chat and listen to their story, until now, I havent met a homeless by his choice...I learnt many things from their stories...and as you said, the most important, I appreciate even more the things I take for granted, but some other people dont have them...
..yeah, the Zahir by Coelho was interesting, depicting homelesness as well, but my favorite is the Alchemist wink
Once again, great post.
  • Dia
  • Greece
  • 3 Nov 2006, 21:45
Great post Suby...I feel the same as well when I pass through the homeless in Athens. I give them clothes whenever I can, their smile is worth all the money of the world, and with some of them, I chat and listen to their story, until now, I havent met a homeless by his choice...I learnt many things from their stories...and as you said, the most important, I appreciate even more the things I take for granted, but some other people dont have them...
..yeah, the Zahir by Coelho was interesting, depicting homelesness as well, but my favorite is the Alchemist
Once again, great post.
I'd like to respond to this Sinem. Firstly, it's easy for you to justify this image online, the man in question has no way of defending himself, so it's asking a certain amount of people who know neither of you to believe only your side of the story (that's me playing devil's advocate). Is your wish to document such poverty, or people living in similar circumstances, something that is compatible with their wishes, or do they have the right to benefit from it as you might soon with an image displayed on some Gallery wall in South Africa? Your reward - notoreity and increased exposure for your work. His reward - sweet fanny adams, or the warmth in his heart that you are shouting for the cause on some website he will never see. A person's image is surely their property, nobody elses, and if you use it, you pay up. I don't think it's wrong of him to ask you for money, does that ruin his integrity or undermine his poorness? Not so I venture to say. I would humbly suggest that you could have offered him something in advance for his co-operation, or does that question your integrity as a photographer merely wishing to record "life" in a pure and unaffected manner? These arguments will always rage, and come to the surface constantly in connection with many diverse, emotionally charged situations. There are, I beleive just as many arguments for, as there are against, no real right or wrong, only shades of both. I think it's unfortunate for suby that this image was the first to be posted, as it set a fire under things straight away, had it come as 2nd or 3rd in a series, it may have not created such a furore. I think you should just put this one down to experience.....much love to you both.
Suby & Sinem: I am very disappointed by your reply to my comment. Firstly, your right to swing your fist (metaphorically) stops where by nose begins; and as far as I am concerned, you have punched my nose by what you consider playing the 'devils' advocate'. It is either in you or not to believe Suby's side of the story as I wasn't there when this shot was taken, but by calling yourself the devil's advocate you are questioning Suby's side of the story and hence his integrity - not just as a photographer but as a person.

Secondly, if you'd actually taken the time to look carefully, you might have noticed that we don't live in South Africa and we don't have exhibitions. I can't speak for Suby, but if this was my image, and I am being completely honest, not just 'defending' Suby, should you wish to also question my honesty, and I were asked to exhibit it in a gallery, I would not hesitate to do so. Not for profit or notoriety... And if you were to ask what I would do for the money, I would donate to Shelter. Do you think people exhibit photographs of starving children in Sudan or the photographs of emaciated naked Jewish at concentration camps for profit or to address socio-political ills of this world?

Thirdly if you look at my comment, I have not questioned the integrity of this man. Only God can judge us, we cannot judge each other. I wish you didn't either.

It is all well and good to end on a message of 'love to you both' but it would be nice to also consider what you criticise - you may not like the photo or agree with the ethics of capture, that does not give you the right to look for ulterior motives or question someone's integrity. Sinem
  • Simone
  • Italy
  • 3 Nov 2006, 21:55
There are many homeless people who choose to be in the streets though, I have met some where I live. When I was in Boston it was very heartbreaking though, specially when it was really cold. So many problems to takle, I think the root of it all if lack of love. i don't see any harm in taking this guy's picture, just a capture of a moment in life, right?
a deep picture with emotions.
hard to see that kind of reality and I appreciate his movement for refusing the shot
a great picture
Suby & Sinem: Thanks Objectif, I am glad you like it smile

Suby
I have found it easier to witness poverty in Asia and parts of Africa than the confrontingness of this pic. Probably becasue he is so much closer to my real life.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks for the comments Daniel.

Suby
  • Nina
  • Tokyo
  • 3 Nov 2006, 22:40
Hey Objectif did you steel one of those "goodies" in your garden from Amelie? I love it!
  • Spacechick
  • Mars
  • 3 Nov 2006, 22:52
Daniel perhaps bcs we have sadly gotten used to the idea that Africa and Asia -parts- are so poor. Instead, when you see it in a first world country people go... ohhh WOW... but is the same suffering, humans beings are human beings. Just as when there are terrorism/war victims from richer or poorer countries, somehow the casualties weigh more or less depending on geographics and that's messed up. But, yes we live in a messed up society, don't we? Suby great pict!! Look how it has inspired people, that's what art is for. And maybe that guy, whithout knowing it, was at the right place and time serving his purpose in life. Ever saw it that way?
Suby & Sinem: Thanks spacechick, your comments actually almosr mirror those of some in here, see Ayo's comments below.

Suby
I think that it is not necessary to play with the misfortune of others, evidently he did not give to you permission for this photo.
sorry
Suby & Sinem: Did anyone ask the starving, emaciated children in Africa for their photographs to be taken with flies buzzing on their faces? Doesn't that make us more aware of poverty there? Why should this shot be any different? Or do you simply respect him more because he is a grown man more able to show his reaction than kids at death's door? Sinem
if you want to be hired as a pro,you have to think as a pro.
start by getting your own website and tell us what the address is
This is a hard one.Clearly a moral issue,rather than a poverty one im afraid.
first of all,it obviously appears he didnt want his pic taken secondly,Suby has an EOS 20D he could have erased the image,but he didnt.
thirdly Suby said he paid for the shot. I assume that Suby showed him the shot and the guy was happy with it afterall.a price was agreed on and Suby got the guy to sign a waiver and both parties were happy.I hope thats what happened Suby.
4thly Suby you posted this in response to shanti's comment " in a public place, any image is fair game". Well now that Suby has declared he has gone pro,we know what kind of images interest him and how far he might go in a public place to to take them
Suby that starement is probably the paparazzi's creed. Please dont forget Lady Diana.
We take pictures of people all the time.most people dont mind,but a few do.i went into BH photovideo,and tested a lens on a camera with no memory card.I pointed the camera at the sales person and he said please dont do that. I said there is no memory card in the camera but he still refused and i respected that.
For those who take pics of others and post them online,please get consent (preferably written)to do so.I have pics of people who i cant display here cos i dont have their consent.
Unfortunately Suby,the skin of this guy looks very un natural I would have used the word "unhealthy",but unhealthy can still look natural in the confines of diseased skin .I guess that happens when photographers forget that they arent mother nature and use all the latest software for editing almost evey picture and disobeying laws of nature.Ive noticed these day that may people on shutter chance rely heavily on editing software. Its ok when used reasonably,but some of us simply abuse it,just like this picture here as well as so many others posted by us. I guess there are courses on how photoshop should be used.If you believe in editing,then take a course in it.

As a photographer gone pro,i suggest you choose your comments very wisely.You might be famous for your work,but not famous for how you get your work done.

I assume you knock on most doors,wait for a response before going in. Photography is no different.

All the best as you go pro.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks for taking the time to make your voice heard on this issue, have to chuck this down as a very emotive issue where lots of people will have different veiws, now as I have said a lot on this page, that for me is the power and impact of this image smile In this day and age, who asks everyone they take a picture of for their consent? Have a look at my post for today, I have also posted a link to an article or wikipedia, have a read, I find it very interesting.

I do a lot of reading on the ins & out of photography rules and laws, I also have my own morals which I will not break, could I have deleted this shot? Yes I could, so why did I not, because in context of the way the image is been used, it works and draws more impact. I could have stepped back, pulled out my zoom lens and taken this guy from afar without him knowing, does that then make the shot an awesome shot? Read Pauls comments below, he also makes some valid points smile

Thanks for commenting,

Suby

P.s
When you going to post up another image?
  • Paul
  • United States
  • 4 Nov 2006, 17:25
Suby, I read, with great interest, all of the comments herein. I'll add my 2 cents worth. Firstly, I see nothing wrong with the photo moraly, ethically, or, with regards to the US, legally. To sum up the rules here for public photography, there is no expectation of privacy in public. What you cannot do is harass someone by following them or continuing to take their picture when they have asked you not to. Photography is not illegal, harassment is.

Now, on to the photo. It is a poignant scene, which, as witnessed by the variety of comments, tugs at the heart and causes all types of emotions. For me, sadness. So, I would have to see that you have achieved a great compliment because your art has caused people to feel something.

Well done!
Suby & Sinem: Thanks a lot for commenting Paul, very different veiws this shot has raised. Surprised even me smile

Suby
Suby,
whatever your intentions are or were or taking this picture,be it Good or Evil,the fact remains that the subject didnt want it taken.No is no Suby,whether we like it or not. Sometimes I see a rare condition in a patient at work and want to take pictures of it- for research,presentations,even for keepsake.some say yes,some say no.The hospital is a public place isnt it? so we can pics as we deem fit,right? Everyone is entitled to their privacy even in a public place.I can sit on the street or in a park and have the right to be left alone,unless im breaking a law.
The man didnt want his picture taken. Very simple.Stuff like this stirs up controversy on how far you will go. i might as well bring out my camera and take pictures of your wife giving birth (no disrespect to her).Afterall the hospital is a public place.
im writing this only for you to see.i think enough has been said about the pic.
Im not sure when ill post again.Work is bezerk at the moment.
  • Diya
  • Switzerland
  • 4 Nov 2006, 21:45
Hi Suby

This is indeed a very sensitive subject. Poverty it self is very delicate and it is a subject which is affecting us all. Of course it is easy to see the poor as a “problem” and it has nothing to do with me. But, in the first place is this true? It is a phenomenon of society, today it is affecting this man you took the picture of and tomorrow it might be you or me, who knows.
Starting to become some awareness, that the situation the man is in, can be my situation any moment, we might get a little more respect for the other. This is then the moment where we have to stop hiding behind laws and regulations, we know that we stepped over boundaries; we know that we mistreated a human being and his dignity.
To me this shot is a teaching to all of us, we who take shots of anything on this planet, we have a responsibility to take, and it is the respect towards other beings. For me this shot is a perfect example (thank you Suby!) where we stepped over it, here the misuse of a person starts.
At the end, I think it would be a gesture, if you could take the shot off the net, especially after so many controversial comments.

Diya
Suby & Sinem: Your veiw duly noted, however I have to humbly decline to remove it. My views as to why I posted this shot up has been well documented. Sorry if this upsets you. Read the interesting comment from Ayo ftom Lagos below smile

Suby
  • Ayo
  • Lagos, Nigeria
  • 5 Nov 2006, 09:08
there is really a lot unsaid about the pic dat i wld have loved 2 hear, but it seems no one is seeing it dat way. i am not trying 2 raise racist issues here, but i strongly believe dat most of d people condemning this image have d same skin colour as the person in d picture. when a 'whiteman' comes down 2 african or asia and takes pictures of beggars or seemingly less priviledged 'blackmen' or 'coloured' people, no one seems to be bother about it and they often see it as a good piece of art, or as indepth photojournalism by an extraordinary photographer. but lets be real to ourselves, poverty is everywhere and is not synonymous 2 africa or asia. we african and i think also asians have 4 so long allowed d so called 'white people' brand us in differnt levels of negativity. let us all as photographers and photo-enthusiast capture images of d world d way it is and not allow certain people use us as agents in their quest against d coloured races.
to SUBY: ur photography is great. u have a great future ahead of u. keep keeping it real.
to EVERYONE 'COLOURED': wld like 2 see more images like this.
CHEERS.
Suby & Sinem: Thanks for that Ayo, it is always lovely to read so many different veiws smile I am really glad you like my images.

Suby
> I went to an exhibition on this day with Jide, Abi & Jamey, there were some photo journalistic images in some books the guys where looking at I would not even look at. A little to real for me, anyone who thinks this is taken it too far has not really been out there. I have seen an image taken by a world renowned journalist of a guy just about toi get his brain blown off, what would the guiys have said if that was posted here, respect, decency? That image won many awards round the world for the photographer and highlighted the plights of the people in that war.


quite.


> How blooming politically correct are we all gettng guys? One point which I think Suby failed to clarify was that the chap in the photo asked him for money to pose - I don't think, for one minute, this photo would have stirred so much strom in a tea cup if he was happily/miserably/sadly/a few pennies richer looking into the camera rather than putting his hand up to cover his face. The gesture is not a sign of 'the wish not to be photographed' but of 'the wish not to be photographed without getting paid for it'. Is it, by nature, any different, in instinct, than Posh and Becks taking extreme security measures not to get their wedding photographed but selling the photos to OK! or celebrities covering up their kids until the photos are centre-spread in Hallo.

> Is what Suby's done any different, n nature, and by instinct, than war photography? As Louise said, when a war photographer captures the image of a dying child and emails it over to Reuters, is that child losing his/her dignity? Or does it help the world to see the lack of dignity that child is subjected to through the atrocities of war?

> The ever so famous Vietnam photo which was recently on the list for the most memorable photographs in the Times... Could the cruelty of humanity be captured for humanity if the photographer had thought, 'Oh let me see, by taking the shot, I'd be taking away this guy's dignity. In fact, let me tae the film out and expose it so the photo is ruined even before it s developed.'

> Let's stop turning a blind eye. The lens sees whom you tend to walk by, averting your eyes every single day; for once, do not 'shoot the messenger' but open your eyes. You will see that the hands held up in defiance are your own trying to cover up your eyes.

you go, girl.




great shot subester.


> Have you read a book called The Sahir by Paulo Coelho? It gives you yet another twist on homelesness, he always adds the magic touch to life and that's why I love him.

thanks for the recommendation, cassiopea. paolo coelho rocks the big one.
  • jlc
  • 7 Nov 2006, 09:33
powerful image !
  • mooch
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 25 Nov 2006, 10:35
Ah man, Suby this is painful. I don't know what you did postprocessing this but the dirt on his feet and hands really stands out. I really like the grit to this it's very powerful. Not sure it's comfortable mind you. Woah.
so vivid, d poverty jumps @ u. A nice capture this is

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon EOS 20D
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/1250s
aperture f/4.5
sensitivity ISO400
focal length 100.0mm
TufaceTuface
I Got You ToI Got You To
The Headless ManThe Headless Man

Warning