Suby & Sins House

14 Feb 2007 1,381 views
 
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photoblog image Journey of a Lifetime

Journey of a Lifetime


SINEM IN THE HOUSE.

Photography by Sinem; editing by Suby.

It's Valentines' Day and I wanted to celebrate the day with a photo of my little sister, Helen and her fiance Gaz. Two months today, Helen and Gaz will tie the knot and take that first step on the path to 'happily ever after'.

A young couple full of life, love and joy, I hear you say, followed by a deep sigh and punctuated by an 'aaaaawwwww'. For me though, they are more than just a young couple in love. For me, Helen is a former student from my first GCSE class and now a little sister - we are still not sure who adopted whom but what does it matter?

Four years ago, Helen was only another teenage face in my first GCSE group of a bunch of crazy fifteen year olds. Painfully arthiritic, she had to use a laptop which I was not made aware of. To make matters worse, my tyrannic department head decided she shouldn't be allowed one. When I announced this the next day, I got a phone call from Helen's mum in the afternoon where she had a go at me and reduced me to tears. It was my first week as a teacher, here I was on a Friday afternoon, sitting in the staffroom, crying my eyes out. Needless to say, Year 10 parents evenings were not experiences I looked forward to that year as the said parent kept me on my toes for the whole year.

The following year, Helen found out she also had diabetes. I was organising a trip to London for my English class to see 'Of Mice and Men'. Prior to the trip, Helen's mum came to see me with instructions about food and the use of hypogel in the case of an episode. Everything went well on the trip and the next day I got a lovely bouquet of flowers thanking me for taking care of Helen.

Helen also wrote a coursework piece at the time titled 'A Life in the Day of...' where students were meant to write about one single day in their lives but tell me as much as they could about their lives, friends, family, goals and dreams. Despite all the health problems she was suffering, Helen's piece was a life lesson in optimism and 'stiff upper lip'; two concepts I've personally always struggled with.

By the end of the school year, I had become Helen's favourite teacher. We organised a theme park trip for Year 10 and 11 kids who would be interested; needless to say, Helen was on the trip and I had all the instructions about her medication I kept with me through the day. A lot of laughter, many rides, a good trip, another lovely bouquet of flowers... I also got to find out that half the time it was my department head who had singlehandedly taken steps to destroy our relations from that first day on. Now that the truth was out, Helen and I bonded through our shared experience of two years, two trips and our shared goal of getting her a C in English despite the absences she'd had due to poor health.

Helen had also got engaged and was planing a wedding in 2007; as I was planning to get married in 2006, I had quite a number of girls in my class asking if they could be my bridesmaids and in a flippant mood, on one of the last days with my first ever GCSE class (my babies, as I refer to them now) I made a joke about being Helen's bridemaid! The next day she officially asked me if I could be her bridesmaid. I can't wait for 14 April 2007 when I will be donning my blue bridesmaid dress and following lovely Helen up the aisle and share one of the happiest days in her life.

Helen taught me how every teenager is speacial in their own way no matter how troublesome and fragile your relationship may be at the beginning of the long journey ahead. We've made the journey together, and I have learned to lay my cards on the table and show my students that their welfare and success are my priorities; even if they might not make you their bridesmaid, they will still appreciate you for your hard work, dedication and honesty.

Thank you Helen, for teaching me that even the most hopeless beginnings can lead us to pricelss journeys of love, trust, mutual respect and friendship.

May the journey you've set out on with Gaz prove to be such...

Happy Valentines' All!

'Ars longa, vita brevis.'


Journey of a Lifetime


SINEM IN THE HOUSE.

Photography by Sinem; editing by Suby.

It's Valentines' Day and I wanted to celebrate the day with a photo of my little sister, Helen and her fiance Gaz. Two months today, Helen and Gaz will tie the knot and take that first step on the path to 'happily ever after'.

A young couple full of life, love and joy, I hear you say, followed by a deep sigh and punctuated by an 'aaaaawwwww'. For me though, they are more than just a young couple in love. For me, Helen is a former student from my first GCSE class and now a little sister - we are still not sure who adopted whom but what does it matter?

Four years ago, Helen was only another teenage face in my first GCSE group of a bunch of crazy fifteen year olds. Painfully arthiritic, she had to use a laptop which I was not made aware of. To make matters worse, my tyrannic department head decided she shouldn't be allowed one. When I announced this the next day, I got a phone call from Helen's mum in the afternoon where she had a go at me and reduced me to tears. It was my first week as a teacher, here I was on a Friday afternoon, sitting in the staffroom, crying my eyes out. Needless to say, Year 10 parents evenings were not experiences I looked forward to that year as the said parent kept me on my toes for the whole year.

The following year, Helen found out she also had diabetes. I was organising a trip to London for my English class to see 'Of Mice and Men'. Prior to the trip, Helen's mum came to see me with instructions about food and the use of hypogel in the case of an episode. Everything went well on the trip and the next day I got a lovely bouquet of flowers thanking me for taking care of Helen.

Helen also wrote a coursework piece at the time titled 'A Life in the Day of...' where students were meant to write about one single day in their lives but tell me as much as they could about their lives, friends, family, goals and dreams. Despite all the health problems she was suffering, Helen's piece was a life lesson in optimism and 'stiff upper lip'; two concepts I've personally always struggled with.

By the end of the school year, I had become Helen's favourite teacher. We organised a theme park trip for Year 10 and 11 kids who would be interested; needless to say, Helen was on the trip and I had all the instructions about her medication I kept with me through the day. A lot of laughter, many rides, a good trip, another lovely bouquet of flowers... I also got to find out that half the time it was my department head who had singlehandedly taken steps to destroy our relations from that first day on. Now that the truth was out, Helen and I bonded through our shared experience of two years, two trips and our shared goal of getting her a C in English despite the absences she'd had due to poor health.

Helen had also got engaged and was planing a wedding in 2007; as I was planning to get married in 2006, I had quite a number of girls in my class asking if they could be my bridesmaids and in a flippant mood, on one of the last days with my first ever GCSE class (my babies, as I refer to them now) I made a joke about being Helen's bridemaid! The next day she officially asked me if I could be her bridesmaid. I can't wait for 14 April 2007 when I will be donning my blue bridesmaid dress and following lovely Helen up the aisle and share one of the happiest days in her life.

Helen taught me how every teenager is speacial in their own way no matter how troublesome and fragile your relationship may be at the beginning of the long journey ahead. We've made the journey together, and I have learned to lay my cards on the table and show my students that their welfare and success are my priorities; even if they might not make you their bridesmaid, they will still appreciate you for your hard work, dedication and honesty.

Thank you Helen, for teaching me that even the most hopeless beginnings can lead us to pricelss journeys of love, trust, mutual respect and friendship.

May the journey you've set out on with Gaz prove to be such...

Happy Valentines' All!

'Ars longa, vita brevis.'


comments (9)

  • Jide Alakija
  • 14 Feb 2007, 00:54
Nice work, the backdrop was too close to the subject in this one though, speaking of which I need back it for a job on Saturday.
Lovely story. Happy Valentines day
  • helen
  • home/UK
  • 14 Feb 2007, 14:56
AWWWWWWW, lol u make me sound so strong n so tuf, lol could neva hav got through it without my family, gaz n friends and of course u smile, thaks 4 really makin me smile this valentines hehehe 2months 2 go!!!!!!! can u believe it? lol
tlk soon sis x
That's a lovely photo and an inspiring story. What we can learn from those we teach.

My brother has been dealing with diabetes since he was 17 and it's difficult to manage but with diligence and discipline it is indeed manageable. He's always been quite severely impacted by it but has done fairly well through the years. He's in his mid-fifties now and still in fair shape, very active, and living pretty well with the disease.
touching story sinem...id say its a good shot but no shot can really do justice to that kind of tale...
Amused even, Suby! Funny pair. Lovely tale
very good portrait of the two of them
superbe portrait
Very nice picture !

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